Study in Canada

Study In Canada
Canada’s universities share a key strength: their high quality. Canadian universities have a long record of providing an accessible university education to students from across Canada and around the world. Reflecting the rich history many cultures and traditions, Canadian universities offer a mix of opportunities in a variety of educational settings. The 89 Universities that are members of the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada are located across the country, with institutions in every Canadian province. Taken together, they offer a wide range of courses.
 
A Range of Choices
Canadian universities provide a full spectrum of undergraduate and graduate degree programs, with faculty undertaking research of national and international importance. Universities in Canada range from large urban, multi-campus and research-intensive universities, offering a wide range of undergraduate, graduate and professional programs, to small liberal arts colleges with a focus on undergraduate education. Others provide specialized professional programs in fields such as business, engineering, art and design or agriculture.
 
You will find that Canada is nothing if not diverse! University colleges represent a new model for postsecondary education, combining practical vocational programs with more theoretical offerings. Since Canada is a bilingual country, our universities demonstrate this by offering instruction in English, French, or even both!
 
A Reputation for Excellence
Canadian universities have earned an international reputation for excellence. Their faculty have recognized research and teaching strengths in areas such as computer sciences, business (including MBA programs), health sciences, law, ocean studies, natural resources and agriculture.
 
In addition to their teaching, universities play a vital role in their local communities, offering concerts and plays, day care centres, sports and fitness facilities, lectures, museums, on-campus radio stations and art galleries open to all. Research is central to the mission of Canadian universities. In fact, 25% of Canada’s research capacity is found in our universities – a far higher proportion than most others countries. Universities in Canada employ about one-third of the country’s PhDs, who spearhead the national research effort. Students at Canadian universities are frequently involved in research projects, often during their early undergraduate years. Professors see research as an integral component to their classroom teaching.
 
Canadian university research has yielded a wealth of innovations as important as insulin, Pablum, the artificial pacemaker, improved strains of wheat, and the identification of the genetic causes of diseases such as cystic fibrosis, muscular dystrophy and Lou Gehrig’s disease. Today, Canadian researchers are world leaders in areas such as helping people cope with pain and stress, improving human memory, pulp and paper chemistry, dealing with the impact of technology in the workplace, and finding new treatments for cancer, osteoporosis and arthritis.
 
At what point I can start preparing my application?
Before you start packing, you must first be accepted to one of the recognized universities/schools in Canada, and only then you can apply for a Canadian student visa.
 
What if the course I want to attend to is shorter then 6 months?
You do not need a study permit if you plan to take a course or program in Canada that lasts six months or less. You must complete the course or program within the period authorized for your stay in Canada.
 
Will I need to have an interview?
Once the immigration officer has reviewed your application, they decide if an interview is necessary. If so, the visa officer will provide details of the time and place.
 
What happens if my application is approved?
A letter of introduction will be sent to you confirming the approval. This letter is not your study permit. Bring the letter of introduction with you to show to immigration officials at the point of entry when you arrive in Canada.
 
What happens when I arrive in Canada?
When you arrive in Canada, the immigration officer at the port of entry will determine whether you may enter Canada and how long you may stay. You must leave Canada on or before the date set by the immigration officer or have your status extended by an immigration officer in Canada.
 
Is there any difference in the process if I want to study in Quebec?
If you apply to study in Quebec, you need a certificate of acceptance or CAQ.
 
What if I change my address?
If you move or change your address, telephone number or any other contact information after you submit your application, you must notify us immediately.
 
How do I renew my study permit while I am in Canada?
If you want to renew your study permit, you must apply before the permit expires. If your study permit has expired, you must leave Canada. In some cases, you may be able to apply for restoration of status. However, you are not allowed to study until your status has been restored.
 
Am I allowed to return home for a visit or travel outside Canada during my studies?
If you leave Canada and want to return, you must have:

  • a valid passport or travel documents
  • a valid study permit if you are returning to study in Canada and
  • a valid temporary resident visa if you are a citizen of a designated country for which Canada requires a visa.
 If you are a citizen of a designated country and you travel to a country other than the United States, Greenland or Saint-Pierre et Miquelon, you will need a multiple-entry visa to re-enter Canada. If your temporary resident visa has expired or if your visa was only valid for a single entry, you must re-apply for a temporary resident visa at a Canadian visa office outside Canada before you can re-enter Canada.
 
How do I find out if I can work while studying in Canada?
Foreign students can work in Canada during their studies, and after they graduate. In most cases, you will need to apply for one of the student-related work permits, which are required if you want to work in a co-op/internship placement, off campus, or after graduating from your studies (Post-Graduation Work Permit Program).